Scholarship at Rutgers

Bullying Prevention and Bystander Intervention

Sarah McMahon, an assistant professor in the School of Social Work and the associate director at the Center for Violence Against Women and Children, has been awarded a federal R01 grant from the Centers for Disease Control entitled “Experimentally Testing a Campus Based Bystander Model.” Conducted in collaboration with the Office for Violence Prevention and Victim Assistance, this multiyear project investigates the effectiveness of the “SCREAMing to Prevent Violence” model that delivers multi-dosage primary prevention and bystander intervention education to incoming college students. The experimental study will assess its longitudinal impact on behavioral intent and actual behaviors related to sexual violence and bystander intervention. Based on the results, a guide will be created to assist programs nationwide in developing and implementing bystander education programs on college campuses. Click here to learn more about Professor McMahon, and click here to learn more about the Center for Violence Against Women and Children.

 

Coming Out

Michael C. LaSala, an associate professor in the School of Social Work and the director of the MSW program, is the author of Coming Out, Coming Home: Helping Families Adjust to a Gay or Lesbian Child (Columbia University Press, 2010). The book describes the findings and practice implications of a qualitative study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, of 65 gay and lesbian youth and their families. Click here to learn more about Professor LaSala, and click here to learn more about his book.

 

Health and Mental Health

Kathleen J. Pottick, a professor in the School of Social Work, is the co-author of “Comparing Pre-, Post-, and Transitional-aged Clients in U.S. Outpatient Mental Health Services.” Using nationally representative data from the 1997 Client/Patient Sample Survey, the study’s authors describe the demographic and clinical profiles of pre-transitional children (0-15 years old), transitional youth (16-25 years old), and post-transitional adults (26-35 years old) in outpatient mental health services and identify correlates of psychotropic medication receipt. The study’s results highlight the unique qualities of transitional youth as well as qualities that are shared with other age groups, confirming and extending the understanding of the complex developmental needs of transitional-aged youth in services. Click here to learn more about Professor Pottick, and click here to read the study.

 

Race and Sexuality
Carlos Ulises Decena, an associate professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, is the author of Tacit Subjects: Belonging and Same-Sex Desire among Dominican Immigrant Men (Duke University Press, 2011). Drawing on ethnographic research with Dominicans in New York City, Tacit Subjects is a pioneering analysis of how gay immigrant men of color negotiate race, sexuality, and power in their daily lives. Click here to learn more about Professor Decena, and click here to learn more about his book.